New Study Identifies Post-Debate Opinions of Presidential Candidates

New Study Identifies Post-Debate Opinions of Presidential Candidates

A recent political research study by the National Business Research Institute, Inc. (“NBRI”) shows that post-debate opinions of the 2008 Presidential Candidates changed when compared to pre-debate opinions. The initial survey was distributed to a random sample of 61,018 individuals in September, 2008, prior to the Presidential and Vice-Presidential debates. NBRI received 2,571 completed surveys. The post-debate survey was distributed to a random sample of 56,386 individuals in October, 2008, just after the final Presidential and Vice-Presidential debates. NBRI received 2,138 completed surveys. A confidence level of 99% and a 3% sampling error was achieved. Independent Sample T-Tests were conducted to compare pre-debate and post-debate opinions. All statistics reported are significant at the .05 alpha level.

NBRI’s 2008 Presidential Candidate Study reveals that:

  • Pennsylvanians’ belief that Barack Obama understands the issues facing Average Americans increased 16%, from 42% pre-debates to 58% post-debates.
  • New Yorkers agreement with same-sex marriage declined 15% from 59% before the debates to 44% following the debates.
  • Democrats are less in favor of offshore drilling following the debates (42% pre-debates vs. 37% post-debates).
  • Republicans disagreement with Universal Healthcare increased 7%, from 64% pre-debates to 71% post-debates.
  • Men’s disagreement with same-sex civil unions increased 5%, from 45% before the debates to 50% after the debates.
  • Men’s perceptions regarding Homeland Security as the most important issue when selecting a President declined 6%, from 40% pre-debates to 34% post-debates.
  • Married individuals’ belief that Barack Obama understands the issues facing Average Americans increased 4%, from 39% pre-debates to 43% post-debates.

Additional findings include:

  • The percentage of Women disagreeing with the death penalty declined 4%, from 66% before the debates to 62% after the debates.
  • Americans’ (Age 65 and over) perception that The War in Iraq is least important when selecting a President declined 8%, from 37% pre-debates to 29% post-debates.
  • Perceptions of individuals earning $100,000 or more regarding Illegal Immigration as least important when selecting a President increased 6%, from 66% pre-debates to 72% post-debates.
  • Perceptions of individuals earning $50,000 – $74,999 regarding Healthcare as the most important issue when selecting a President increased 6%, from 18% pre-debates to 24% post-debates.
  • College Graduates’ belief that The Economy is the most important issue when selecting a President increased 11%, from 70% pre-debates to 81% post-debates.
  • Graduate School students’ belief that The Economy is the most important issue when selecting a President increased 9%, from 72% pre-debates to 81% post-debates.

NBRI is a consulting firm that specializes in psychological research (customer, employee, patient, political, and market research studies) in order to assist businesses and governments in understanding the thinking of their human populations. The firm was founded in 1982 and the consultants working for NBRI possess Ph.D. degrees in Organizational Psychology with expertise in statistics and psychological research.

For more information, please contact:

National Business Research Institute, Inc. (“NBRI”)
2701 Dallas Parkway, Suite 650, Plano, TX 75093
Main: 972.612.5070; Toll Free in the U.S.: 800.756.6168
www.nbrii.com

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